Faithful Cities Report

The Diocese of Manchester played a major part in the publication of the Church of England report Faithful Cities published in 2006.

Millions of pounds have been poured into Britain's city in recent years, but the resultant growth has forced many to the margins and dramatised the gap between the 'super rich' and the poorest. That is the challenge highlighted by Faithful Cities: A call for celebration, vision and justice.

Two of the key contributors to the report are from the Diocese of Manchester: the Rt Revd Stephen Lowe, Bishop of Hulme and Bishop for Urban Life and Faith and Professor Elaine Graham, Samuel Ferguson Professor of Social and Pastoral Theology at The University of Manchester.

The report emphasises the role of Church and other faith communities in providing a significant network and vital resource for community development and cohesion within our urban areas.

Faithful Cities argues that cities have been transformed, both in how they look and who lives in them, in the last 20 years. Yet the extremes of poverty and prosperity are not so different. For example, in Moss Side, the report says, "when you look at the black community, young people are more likely to be over represented in the prison population and to under achieve at schools … over the last ten years Moss Side doesn’t seem to have moved on in terms of wealth or jobs".

The report contains a number of recommendations for faith communities and Government, and asks 'What makes a good city?'.

Key recommendations:

 

  • The Church of England should maintain a presence across our urban areas.
  • The gap between those living in poverty and the very wealthy must be reduced.
  • Faith groups must play a role in combating racism, fascism and religious intolerance.
  • Asylum seekers deserve to be allowed to sustain themselves and contribute to society through paid work.
  • There should be a review of the role of faith schools in urban settings.
  • Church leaders should initiate a debate about what makes a good city in the light of this report.

To download a copy of the report, visit www.culf.org.uk.